General Information

Standby  Generator

Electricity, once a luxury, is now essential.  To beat weather-related electrical outages, many rural households and businesses are investigating back-up power generators for use in an emergency.

Generators are widely available in a range of sizes and configurations.  Some come equipped with either gas or diesel engines.  Others operate from the power take-off (PTO) attachment found on farm tractors.  These devices all have one thing in common – they produce electricity at levels high enough to cause injury, death and property damage.  That doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be used.  But, like any other electrical equipment, they must be correctly sized and properly installed.

If you plan to provide enough electricity to power your entire home during an outage, you will need a generator with a relatively large capacity.  Generators are rated by the wattage they produce – usually expressed in kilowatts (kW), and are sized according to the loads they serve.  Also important is the kind of service you receive, either single or three-phase power.  Most homes and farm/ranch operations have single-phase power with 120/240 dual voltage.

More important than sizing is correct installation.  Auxiliary power sources must be completely isolated from KBR’s power lines that are attached to your meter to avoid “backfeed” into the District’s electric system.  During an outage, linemen trying to restore power, or anyone who contacts a downed power-line, could be seriously injured or killed by backfeed from an improperly installed generator.  To prevent this from happening, a special switch, called a double-throw switch, is required to prevent a generator’s feedback from passing through KBR’s transformers and power lines.

KBR Rural Public Power District will provide one double-pole, double-throw transfer switch per rural customer at no charge.  Contact the office for more specific details to determine eligibility.  To make the operation of a generator safe for our customers, KBR offers the following guidelines:

  • Never connect a generator directly to the electrical system of any building without the installation of a double-pole, double-throw transfer switch as required by the National Electrical Code.
  • Always ground the generator’s electrical system adequately to avoid electrocution.
  • Always operate a generator in a clean, dry, well ventilated area to avoid electrical shock and carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Never use worn, damaged, undersized or ungrounded extension cords with a generator.
  • Place the generator on a low-conductivity surface such a concrete slab before operating.
  • Never exceed the load capacity of a generator by attaching too many items or items with very high load ratings which could result in a fire.
  • Never attempt to refuel a generator while it is running or hot.  Turn the engine off and allow it to cool before adding fuel.  Have a fire extinguisher in the immediate area certified to handle fuel fires.

Rates

  • Residential
    0.18245 Per Kwh for 300 Kwh/Mo. – 0.10185 Per Kwh for All Additional Use/Mo.
  • Residential services with a 10 kVa transformer will have a monthly charge of $21.50.
  • Those with a higher kVa transformer will pay $1.50 per kVa for a monthly charge.
  • Residential – All Electric
    0.18245 Per KWh for 300 Kwh/Mo. – 0.07640 Per Kwh All Add. Use/Mo.
  • Residential services with a 10 kVa transformer will have a monthly charge of $21.50.
  • Those with a higher kVa transformer will pay a$1.50 per kVa for a monthly charge.
  • General Service
    0.2208 Per Kwh for 300 Kwh/Mo. – 0.10125 Per Kwh for All Additional Use/Mo.
  • General services with a 10 kVa transformer will have a monthly charge of $21.50.
  • Those with a higher kVa transformer will pay $1.50 per kVa for a monthly charge.
  • General Service – All Electric
    0.2208 Per Kwh for 300 Kwh/Mo. – 0.1010 Per Kwh for 700 Kwh/Mo. –0.0750 Per Kwh for 5,000. Use/Mo. For all Additional kwh/Mo. is .1014
  • General Services with a 10 kVa transformer will have a monthly charge of $21.50.
  • Those with a higher kVa transformer will pay $1.50 per kVa for a monthly charge.
  • Rental Lights
    100 W HPS/63 W LED – $9.50 + .52 (tax) = $10.02
    250 W HPS – $15.75 + .87 (tax) = $16.62
  • Monthly Minimum
  •   The monthly minimum is equal to the size of the kVa of your transformer x $1.50, for example if  your  transformer is a 25 kVa then your minimum is $37.50. (25 x $1.50=$37.50)

PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Electric Heat Rebate Program

KBR Rural Public Power District has established an Electric Heat Rebate Program to encourage customers to install electric heat as their primary heating source.

Rebates will be calculated on a per kW of electric heat basis. No preference will be shown as to the type or efficiency of the electric heating source.

Electric water heaters must be a minimum size of 30 gallons. This does notinclude the on demand water heaters.

Rebates will be considered on new or conversion loads, not replacements.

Rebate Amounts

  • New Construction………………………………………………$15 per kW of electric heat
  • Conversion of existing structure…………………………..$20 per kW of electric heat
  • Electric Water Heater – (30 gallon min)………………..$100